Propazine – toxicity, side effects, diseases and environmental impacts

Thursday, December 14, 2017 by

Propazine is a chlorotriazine herbicide used to control broadleaf weeds and annual grasses in sweet sorghum. It is applied as a spray at the time of planting or right after planting, but before weed or sorghum emergence.

Propazine is also used as a post-emergence selective herbicide on vegetation such as carrots, celery and fennel. It is available in wettable powder, liquid and water dispersible granular formulations. Propazine appears as a colorless crystalline solid.

Propazine is classified as a general use herbicide by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Products containing propazine must bear the EPA signal word “Caution” to indicate that it is slightly poisonous.

Propazine’s trade names and identifiers include:

  • Prozinex
  • Gesamil
  • 139-40-2
  • Milogard
  • Plantulin
  • Propazin
  • Primatol P
  • Propasin
  • Milo-pro
  • 2-Chloro-4,6-bis(isopropylamino)-s-triazine
  • Propazine (herbicide)
  • Geigy 30,028
  • Milocep
  • Propazin (VAN)
  • 2-Chloro-4,6-bis(isopropylamino)-1,3,5-triazine
  • Caswell No. 184
  • 2,4-Bis(isopropylamino)-6-chloro-s-triazine
  • 6-Chloro-N,N’-bis(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine
  • Maxx 90

List of known side effects

The major hazards encountered in the use and handling of propazine are caused by its toxicologic properties. It is toxic by all routes and exposure to this colorless powder may occur from its manufacture and use as an herbicide. Effects of exposure to propazine may include shortness of breath, muscle spasms, ataxia, and anorexia.

Propazine is mildly irritating to the skin, eyes, and upper respiratory tract. Contact dermatitis has been reported among workers manufacturing propazine. No cases of poisoning from human ingestion of this herbicide have been recorded. Skin and eye contact with propazine, as well as inhalation, should be avoided.

Administration of lethal or near-lethal doses to rats has caused symptoms of lethargy, muscular weakness, runny nose, emaciation, diarrhea and labored breathing.

Body systems affected by propazine

Liver damage is one of the suspected effects of propazine. The functioning of certain liver processes was decreased in rats that received 2,500 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of propazine.

Items that can contain propazine

The herbicide propazine is used to control pests like annual morning glory, pigweed, smartweed, carpet weed, lambsquarter, ragweed and velvetleaf. It is applied to plants such as sorghum and corn. It is also applied on some Umbelliferae vegetables, carrots, fennel, ornamental and greenhouse plants.

Some manufacturers and suppliers of products using this active include:

  • Griffin Corporation
  • Ciba Geigy
  • Makhteshim Agan

Example of products using this active include:

  • Milogard
  • Milo-Pro
  • Gesamil
  • Milocep

How to avoid propazine

Always wear personal protective equipment (PPE) when handling propazine. Wear protective gloves and clothing to prevent any reasonable probability of skin contact. Contact lenses should not be worn when working with this chemical. Wear dust-proof chemical goggles and face shield unless full face-piece respiratory protection is worn. Employees should wash immediately with soap when skin is wet or contaminated. Employers must provide workers with emergency showers and an eyewash station.

After handling propazine, users should:

  • Wash hands before eating, drinking, chewing gum, using tobacco or using the toilet.
  • Remove clothing immediately if the herbicide gets inside. Then wash thoroughly and change into clean clothing.
  • Remove PPE immediately after handling this product. Wash the outside of gloves before removing. Wash thoroughly and change into clean clothing as soon as possible.

Where to learn more

Summary

Propazine is a chlorotriazine herbicide used to control broadleaf weeds and annual grasses in sweet sorghum.

The herbicide propazine is used to control pests like annual morning glory and pigweed. It is applied to plants such as sorghum and corn. It is also applied on some Umbelliferae vegetables, carrots, fennel, ornamental, and greenhouse plants.

Propazine is mildly irritating to the skin, eyes, and upper respiratory tract. Contact dermatitis has been reported among workers manufacturing propazine. No cases of poisoning from human ingestion of this herbicide have been recorded. Skin and eye contact with propazine, as well as inhalation, should be avoided.

 

Sources include:

PMEP.CCE.Cornell.edu

PubChem.NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov

SiteM.Herts.AC.uk

ExToxNet.ORST.edu



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